Home
Alopecia

Buy medications to treat Alopecia online In Canada

FREE Shipping in Canada

Buy Alopecia medications like Apo Gain, Dupixent and Elidel online from PocketPills with FREE prescription delivery. Renew your Alopecia prescription or schedule a consultation to receive a new prescription today!

We make it unbelievably easy to fill prescriptions, consult with pharmacists, and order medications online

info

Refill your prescription

Consult a doctor online

Upload your prescription

Enter your phone to save time & money

+1

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy. Message and data rates may apply.

What is it?

Causes

Symptoms And Complications

How to diagnose?

Treatment and Preventions

FAQs

What is Alopecia?

Alopecia refers to hair loss from any part of the body for any reason. There are several types, ranging from thinning hair to complete baldness. Alopecia is broadly classified into 2 categories. In non-scarring alopecia, the hair follicles are still alive and hair can be grown. In scarring alopecia, the hair follicles are destroyed and will not regrow hair.

Diffuse alopecia (thinning scalp hair) is common among seniors, both men and women alike.

Androgenic alopecia, also known as "male pattern baldness" and "female pattern baldness," can strike younger as well as older people. It's genetic, so having a family history can predict if you might inherit it. In both men and women, it's linked to having an excess of male hormones (androgens) around the hair follicles, which can block hair growth. Women are more likely to develop androgenic alopecia after Menopause, when they have fewer female hormones.

Most cases of hair loss are due to androgenic alopecia. Approximately 50% of men by the age of 50 years and 15% of women before the time they reach menopause have some degree of androgenic alopecia.

Alopecia areata typically causes a few temporary bald patches on the scalp. It tends to run in families and often strikes in childhood. The hair loss seems to be part of an immune system problem, in which the body's natural defences mistakenly attack its own tissue. Once the hair has fallen out in certain spots, new growth is suppressed for weeks or months. This type of alopecia sometimes affects people who have other "autoimmune" diseases like Thyroid disease, Lupus, or pernicious Anemia. Sometimes, it may produce complete scalp baldness (alopecia totalis) or total loss of body hair (alopecia universalis).

Telogen effluvium is a form of hair loss often associated with pregnancy, medication use, life stress, diets, or surgery. It results in a larger amount of hair cycling into the resting (telogen) state where the hairs are ready to fall out. This type of alopecia usually improves on its own after several months. While it usually resolves, it can become chronic without regrowth of hair.

Scarring alopecia is a form of hair loss that results in scarring, where scarred areas will not regrow hair. This type of alopecia may have several causes. For example, fungus can leave permanent bald patches.

What causes Alopecia?

There are many different potential causes of alopecia. Hair loss – temporary or permanent – can be triggered by any number of factors. These can include Allergies, irritants, toxins, Burns, injuries, and infections. We also know that certain medications (especially anabolic steroids), chronic kidney failure, radiation, and chemotherapy can cause hair to fall out. Sometimes, hair loss may be due to a vitamin A overdose, Iron Deficiency Anemia, a malfunctioning thyroid gland, Fever, hormonal imbalances, or pregnancy.

Alopecia Symptoms And Complications

Thinning hair is the most obvious symptom of androgenic alopecia. In men, it begins at the crown, temples, or both. They also tend to get a "high forehead" that's associated with a receding hairline. For women, hair loss begins on the top of the head. While men can go completely bald, women don't usually lose all the hair on the crown of the head.

Alopecia areata appears as sudden losses of small round patches of hair, usually from the scalp, but sometimes from the face or body. The fingernails may be lightly pitted or stippled. The disease often comes and goes in cycles, with regrowth in between.

How to diagnose Alopecia

While hair loss can be very distressing, alopecia by itself isn't harmful – the damage is cosmetic. But there's always a chance that alopecia might be a secondary effect or symptom of some other illness. To be sure, only medical tests and a full discussion with your doctor can ensure the right diagnosis. Always see a doctor if you start to lose hair.

Family history will often tell the doctor what type of alopecia a person has. Occasionally, a punch biopsy may be necessary to determine the type of hair loss. Looking at plucked hairs under a microscope can help to tell the difference between alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia. Other tests might be done to check for autoimmune diseases like lupus that can accompany alopecia.

Alopecia Treatment and Preventions

While there's no way to prevent most types of hair loss, the goal of treatment is to slow or stop the loss of hair and then grow new hair.

Medications are available that encourage regrowth of hair. These medications, such as topical Minoxidil* and oral Finasteride, are not appropriate for everyone with hair loss. Hair growth medications work to varying degrees in different people, and only trigger complete regrowth in a minority of individuals. They work best for people who have smaller amounts of hair loss. Hair loss returns if you stop taking the medication. Finasteride is not appropriate for women who may become pregnant, as it can cause severe birth defects. Spironolactone, although not approved by Health Canada for this purpose, is a medication that may help women who are losing hair due to excess testosterone. Biotin is a vitamin that makes hair and nails stronger and is often used as an adjuvant therapy.

Corticosteroids are another type of medication that may be used for some types of hair loss. Less severe cases of alopecia areata are sometimes treated with corticosteroids injected into the affected area or applied to the skin for people who cannot tolerate the injections. Systemic (pill-form) corticosteroids have long-term side effects and are reserved for more severe cases.

Another treatment for unresponsive alopecia areata is to deliberately provoke an allergic reaction (contact dermatitis) with a chemical applied to the scalp. A rash develops, and hair often grows back in the same spot a few months later. It can be uncomfortable, though.

Some people with hair loss have slightly low iron or zinc levels and may benefit from iron and zinc supplements.

If there is a systemic disease leading to hair loss, then treating the underlying disease may aid in hair growth.

For severe alopecia of any type, medication may improve the condition, but not cure it. The remaining options are to undergo surgery or wear a wig or hairpiece. The other option is to learn to live with the condition and not pursue medical options.

Surgery usually means a hair transplant. Small plugs of scalp, each with two or three hairs attached, are taken from areas of thick hair, and planted in the affected part of the scalp. Fewer hairs per square inch are needed for people with wavy or curly hair, or people whose hair and skin colours match.

Unfortunately, further hair loss can ruin any transplant, and leave you without enough donor hairs. The least successful candidates for transplant are men in their 20s who are balding fast. Such men, especially those whose fathers were or are bald by the age of 55 years, should know that a very expensive transplant won't last forever.

Although wigs may not sound like the best option, they often are. Good quality modern hairpieces can be undetectable (though expensive). Many grip by vacuum and won't fall off – even during contact sports.


Frequently asked questions

How to buy Alopecia medications online?

You can buy your medications to treat Alopecia online at PocketPills if you already have a valid prescription from your doctor. You can get started by uploading your prescription, ordering a refill by transferring any existing medications to our pharmacy or talking to one of our Canadian Doctors to get an online prescription. Get started now!

Can I get brand name Alopecia medications or chose to get generics?

Absolutely. You can always communicate your preference for brand or generic medications during your online consultation. As a policy, PocketPills advocates generic medications as more affordable and more likely to be covered by your insurance plan

Can I get a prescription on PocketPills for Alopecia?

Yes, our physicians can prescribe medications online during your consultation. Once you receive a prescription, you'll have the option to have it delivered to your door in discreet packaging and at no additional cost!. Click here to get an online prescription today!

References

All material © 1996-2021 MediResource Inc. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Reading is good for you...

Reading about what's good for you is even better.

Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes
All about Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Medications
How Effective Is Bupropion In Treating Seasonal Affective Disorder?

Top prescribed Alopecia drugs

Already a member?

Sign In
You're almost there!

Simply sign in to join
over 150,000 satisfied members:

or

+1

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy. Message and data rates may apply.


Prefer to sign up over the phone?

Our care team can't wait to take your call!

 

Refill your prescription

You don't have to wait in line at the store to fill your prescriptions. You can have your doctor fax your prescription to them, input the details of your old pharmacy online, or take a picture of your prescription with the online pharmacy app.

Consult a doctor online

Skip the waiting room! See a Canadian doctor online, for free and get treated for any common condition on your phone.

*Note: Fully covered with a British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba or Ontario health card.

Upload your prescription

Upload a picture of your prescription(s), allowing us to receive an image of your prescription and begin the process of filling your prescription(s). However, we will require the original hard copy of your prescription to be sent to us in order to complete filling your prescription.